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Jobs You Can Do Without A Work Permit In Canada

Jobs You Can Do Without A Work Permit In Canada, If you’re from Canada and want to work in another country, the first thing that needs to be done is get a work permit. This is because there are some jobs that Canadians can’t perform without one.

If you’re planning on moving abroad for a job or if you just want to see what’s available in other countries, then read on!

Jobs You Can Do Without A Work Permit In Canada

Answering inquiries over the phone or in person.

If you want to answer inquiries over the phone or in person, there are some jobs that require a work permit. This can include:

  • Answering inquiries for a business
  • Answering inquiries for a non-profit
  • Answering inquiries for a government agency (such as provincial or federal) or company

In these cases, you must have an official work permit from your country of origin and be working under the terms set out by their immigration authorities.

Assisting a nurse, doctor, or surgeon during a medical procedure.

If you have a work permit and want to assist a nurse, doctor, or surgeon during a medical procedure, the job is not for you. You must be under the supervision of someone who has a work permit. You need to be in the hospital with them so they can instruct you on what they want to be done by way of helping out with their patient’s care.

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You also cannot do any kind of surgery yourself; only follow instructions given by your supervisor (as above).

Baby-sitting.

You can also babysit, which is a job you can do without a permit. It’s not just for kids: you can take care of your own pets or infants as well. Baby-sitting is legal in Canada, as long as it doesn’t involve making money from the job.

You should never babysit for strangers unless they’re friends or family members who have asked for help with their kids at some point before now and would like to offer it again in the future—but even then, it’s best to ask first if this person has any special needs before agreeing to look after them!

Carrying bags at the airport, bus station, or train station.

If you want to help someone who is old, young, or disabled carry their own bags at the airport, bus station, or train station, there are a few things you can do without having a work permit.

  • You can ask if they need help carrying their luggage. It’s polite to offer your services as long as they don’t seem offended by this offer (and then make sure they’re aware of how much it cost).
  • You could ask if they want one of your friends’ help carrying some bags instead of hiring one of those expensive wheelchairs (which might not even fit into the overhead bins).
  • If none of these options appeal to them then maybe just let them know that there are some people willing to carry their belongings for free!

Carrying out clerical duties such as photocopying and filing.

You can work as a clerk without a work permit if you are doing clerical duties such as photocopying and filing.

Clerical duties may also be performed by your spouse/partner if they are already working in Canada. However, these duties must be performed for an organization that is not owned by either of them (for example, it could be a family-run business).

Cleaning buildings or offices.

If you want to work as a cleaner in Canada, you must be at least 16 years old and have a valid Social Insurance Number (SIN). There are also restrictions on how much time you can work and where:

  • You cannot work more than 8 hours per day or 40 hours per week. If your employer provides paid breaks, those breaks must also be taken within these limits.
  • Your employer must give you a written statement that describes the conditions of your employment before starting work; this document should state how many days/hours per week that person will be required to work and whether there are any other restrictions on their ability to change jobs or move locations without permission from the original employer.

Cooking.

Cooking is not a job you can do without a work permit in Canada.

There are some exceptions, but they are very limited and include:

  • Working in a restaurant as long as this is your primary source of income (i.e., if you have no other work available).
  • Working in a hotel or similar establishment that provides room service to guests and residents of the property where it’s located (but not restaurants). This includes hotels, motels, or conference centers that offer room service only; however, if there’s an actual restaurant on site then it may be considered as well depending on how many employees there are working together at any given time (for example one person preparing food for all guests would still qualify even though he/she isn’t technically employed by management).

Caring for animals is part of an informal arrangement with the animal’s owner.

  • You will be caring for animals as part of an informal arrangement with the animal’s owner.
  • You must have your own place to live and food to eat.
  • You may be paid $10-30/hour depending on how many hours you work per week.
  • You must be able to lift up to 50 pounds, which means most domesticated cats can’t be cared for by someone like yourself who doesn’t have a job or even a car!

Driving cars or light vehicles for personal use (not for commercial purposes).

You can drive cars and light vehicles for personal use (not for commercial purposes).

This includes:

  • driving a car, truck, or van as your primary means of transportation;
  • driving an SUV if it’s the only vehicle you own that is NOT used for business purposes; and
  • using your vehicle as part of your job duties.

Farming (as long as you’re not working on a commercial farm).

Farming is a good example of work that you can do without a work permit. If you’re not working on a commercial farm, there are no restrictions on who can do it—kids and seniors alike.

However, if your employer wants to hire someone who is under 18 or over 65 (and if they have fewer than 100 employees), then he or she must obtain an appropriate permit from Citizenship and Immigration Canada before hiring them.

Helping someone with their personal care (such as dressing, grooming, bathing, etc.).

In some instances, you may need a work permit to do certain jobs. For example, if you are helping someone with their personal care (such as dressing, grooming, bathing, and feeding), then this could be considered an employment relationship and require a work permit.

However, there are other jobs where no work permit is required for the said activity.

For example:

  • Helping with personal care such as dressing or feeding someone else – No Work Permit Required!

Home renovations are performed by you or your spouse/partner for yourselves or for members of your family.

  • Renovations performed by you or your spouse/partner for yourselves or for members of your family.
  • Home renovations must be performed on property owned by yourself, your spouse/partner, or a member of your family (for example: if you are married to an employee of the federal government who is renting out their basement). The renovations themselves may not be commercial in nature (for example: installing new carpet), but they must have been done at least partly because the property was being used as a home.

House cleaning and/or house painting is performed by you or your spouse/partner for yourselves or for members of your family.

You can do house cleaning and/or house painting for yourself or for members of your family.

House cleaning and/or house painting are not considered skilled trades, so you will not require a work permit to do them. However, if you are earning money from the activity by charging others to clean their homes on your behalf (which is legal), then it may be time to apply for a work permit. If you’re just doing it as part of your regular routine at home or elsewhere without charging anyone else money then there’s no need for applying for one!

Landscaping is performed by you or your spouse/partner on property owned by yourself, your spouse/partner, or a member of your family.

  • Landscaping is performed by you or your spouse/partner on property owned by yourself, your spouse/partner, or a member of your family.
  • If the landscaping is being done for someone else and not for profit (i.e., it’s not an entrepreneurial venture), then this exception applies to any job you do at home.

Laying bricks and mixing cement is to be used in an owner-built home that will be occupied only by yourself, your spouse/partner, or members of your family.

Laying bricks and mixing cement is to be used in an owner-built home that will be occupied only by yourself, your spouse/partner, or members of your family.

You can do this job on your own property if you have a building permit. You cannot perform this work for others because you are self-employed.

Conclusion

If you’re looking for a job that doesn’t require a work permit, there are many options. You can work as an independent contractor for companies that hire contractors to help them with their projects. You can also look into becoming an apprentice or trainee with these companies so that they can teach you all about the trade while they teach you how to do everything from bookkeeping to plumbing during this time period when they’re not working anymore themselves!

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